Vipassana

Vipassana Meditation, Mindfull or Insight Meditation

Vipassana is derived from the Theravada school of Buddism. Vipassana emphasizes disciplined self-observation of body and thoughts and how they interconnect. Has clinical application in stress management.

Theravada school of Buddhism – Originally derived from the Theravada school of Buddhism, vipassana can be practiced by followers of any (or no) religion as a useful mental skill set. Theravada is the dominant form of Buddhism in southeast Asia, and for this reason it is sometimes called the “Southern School”. Theravada emphasizes insight gained through critical analysis and personal experience rather than blind faith.

To become an arhat – Theravada emphasizes individual enlightenment; the ideal is to become an arhat (sometimes arahant), which means “worthy one” in Pali. An arhat is a person who has realized enlightenment and freed himself from the cycle of birth and death.

Theravada teaches that enlightenment comes entirely through one’s own efforts, without help from gods or other outside forces. Some schools of Mahayana emphasize this also, but others (for example, Pure Land) are more devotional.

Vipassana meditation – Vipassana emphasizes disciplined self-observation of body and thoughts and how they interconnect.

Vipassana shows clinical application in the fields of pain management, stress management, compulsions and as an adjunct to psychotherapy.

Vipassana, Meditation in Action

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